The New Firefox (Quantum)

In November, Firefox Quantum (Version 57) was released.  It is a big deal (at least to me now, and those that have always liked Firefox).  It is fast.  It is beautiful.  It is on a wide range of platforms (Windows, Mac, iOS, Android, Linux).  And it has brought me back (at least for now) to Firefox after 6 years of being on Google Chrome (I was a Firefox devotee for many years before Chrome).  Yes, I still like Chrome (for the most part) because it is still the most used (right now) but it has become stale and bloated.  Yes, I like Edge (for the most part) because it is also fast but it is only on Windows 10 and with limited add-ons.

It feels fast when I launch the application for the first time.  It feels fast when I use it.  It has nice built-in themes (Default, Dark, and Light).  Firefox once again defaults to Google’s search engine (instead of Yahoo!).  It has a new browsing engine that takes advantage of multiple cores in modern devices.  It has moved to a unified address and search bar (sometimes I like the separate bars when searching for something it believes is a domain name), drops legacy extension support, implements stronger security (better sandbox, for example), and more touch device friendly.

I am still testing Firefox with all my websites and using as a debugging tool.  Right now, it is doing great (for the most part) and it is my default.  It will be interesting to see what the others do in response.  In the meantime, it is great to see a standalone initiative (the non-profit Mozilla Foundation) releasing such a quality product.